Industrial Arts Trade School-Arles, France 
French Line NORMANDIE De Venoge Original Advertising Art
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French

Mixed Media on Canvas Dated 1937
34 ½ x 53 Inches 42 ¼ x 62 Inches Framed
 
   

Industrial Arts Trade School-Arles, France 
 
French
 
French Line NORMANDIE De Venoge Original Advertising Art
⚈ Sold

Mixed Media on Canvas Dated 1937
34 ½ x 53 Inches 42 ¼ x 62 Inches Framed
 
   

Considered by many as the greatest ocean liner ever built, the S.S. NORMANDIE stands to this day as a paragon not only of shipbuilding, but of Art Deco design and advertising.

Begun in 1931, NORMANDIE was built in Saint-Nazaire, on France’s west coast by the Compagnie Générale Transatlantique (CGT). The ship enjoyed an unusual level of financial support from the French Government, who saw it as an opportunity to promote French industry and prestige abroad. Travelers across the Atlantic spent 4-5 days captive within a liner’s world, and what better way to promote the glory of the French Empire than to have a floating exposition of her finest engineers, craftsmen and artists.

NORMANDIE was twice the tonnage of the CGT’s flagship ILE DE FRANCE, and when she entered service in 1935 was the largest and most powerful passenger ship afloat. Her unique clipper-like sweeping bow was paired with a bulbous forefoot under the water line. This made the massive ship appear to glide elegantly through the waves with minimal bow wake; all while using 30% less power and fuel than her later speed rival Cunard’s RMS QUEEN MARY.

An innovative placement of her stacks allowed for long open rooms down the length of the ship, which became elegant salons and dining rooms. The finest French metalworkers, cabinetmakers and furniture designers of the day provided the bones of her design which were then decked with René Lalique Glass, Sèvres Porcelain and Aubusson tapestries. Foremost French designers vied for commissions for the most luxurious staterooms. Artists were encouraged to use motifs from France’s colonies in Asia and Africa, an exoticism that already fit well within the Art Deco ... Read More


Inscribed on Edge: Dessin Alternatif 3/9/37 DE VENOGE