Builders Dockyard Model of the Scandinavian American Line’s S.S. UNITED STATES Scottish

Circa 1903
Overall – 148 inches long, 34 wide and 54 high
 
   

Builders Dockyard Model of the Scandinavian American Line’s S.S. UNITED STATES
 

Circa 1903
Overall – 148 inches long, 34 wide and 54 high
 
   

A large and impressive dockyard model in its original mahogany case and stand. Highly detailed throughout with many gold and silver plated fittings.

History of the Vessel:
The Steamship UNITED STATES was a passenger liner of the Scandinavian American Line running between ports in Denmark and Norway to New York. Constructed in 1903 by the renowned Alexander Stephen and Sons yards, Glasgow, the ship was 10,095 tons and 500.8 feet long. She set off on her maiden voyage on March 30, 1903 under Captain Wulff sailing from Copenhagen to Christiana (present-day Oslo) and then Christiansand before sailing to New York by June 3, 1903. She would cover similar routes for more than 30 years before being retired in 1934.

The SS UNITED STATES was a steamsail ship with two masts, considered a schooner. Her twin screws were powered by triple expansion steam engines with a running speed of 15 knots. For her time she was outfitted with the latest technology including electric light and refrigerating machinery along with promenades and public areas outfitted in high style common to the age of the great liners with rich woods and fine furnishings.

Doing away with the old steerage class, the SS UNITED STATES could accommodate 130 first, 140 second and 1,400 third class passengers. While the first and second class had certain luxuries and advantages, the line made sure that all classes of service offered the same level of courtesy and cleanliness including comfortable cabins kept in good order by stewards and stewardesses and even third class included dining room service of good quality food in the Scandinavian style, served by waiters on china with silverware and tablecloths. The trend of good service in all classes would go on to be adopted by many other liners in subsequent years.


Provenance: Seaman’s Bank collection