Builders Dockyard Model INTERPRETER
⚈ Sold

1948
66½" L x 16½" D x 23½" H
Mahogany Glazed Case  
   

Builders Dockyard Model INTERPRETER
 
⚈ Sold

1948
66½" L x 16½" D x 23½" H
Mahogany Glazed Case  
   

One of the first commercial freighters to be launched into service following World War II, the INTERPRETER, after her sister ship HERDSMAN, was built in 1947. They were the first Motor Ships for one of the world’s oldest shipping lines, the Harrison Line, which began under the guidance of brothers Thomas and James in 1853. Built by the premier shipbuilding firm of William Doxford & Sons of Sunderland, the company held the reputation for employing highly skilled artisans at every level, including those constructing their models. Doxford Yards would build a total of 21 ships for the Harrison Line.

Stalwart lines of numerous cargo booms and five massive holds show the capacity of this commercial carrier, to which the Harrison Line included an additional deck level for first-class passenger service for eight beneath the cabin superstructure. In its original glazed case, and properly identified with two original company plaques inside, this is a great shipping line artifact. Gold and silver plated fittings, nice determinations between the cargo areas and the decks are present. Painted in the traditional three-staged hull colors of the dark rose, pale pink and deep blue-black with wood planked decks complete with inked boards throughout.

The steamships of the Harrison Line were named obviously after the professions of Britain, and served in a multitude of routes. Many were put into military service during wars only to return to the company and run strong for years. The diesel-powered INTERPRETER and HERDSMAN began the next wave of innovations that allowed the company to continue building larger, faster ships for the next 30 years. Measuring 435'L x 60'B x 32'D, INTERPRETER put in nearly 20 years of service before being sold. Her model resided with the company’s ownership until now.